Moldies Call to Action: Email The Beast

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The Daily Beast’s Farah Khan recently wrote the controversial article “Your not a doctor, Why is the Internet so Obsessed with Toxic Mold?” It seemed to come out of left field. I later learned it came straight out of 2006. 

Sharon Kramer, who has been on the front lines fighting the scientific fraud issue that, “toxic mold does not harm” consistently states the exact literature Kahn chose to cite in her recent article was used by defense lawyers as a weapon of mass destruction in toxic mold cases years ago. It is and always has been a heavily criticized publication. This source of information is also severely outdated. Not only was it published over 10 years ago it has also been sunsetted. I asked Sharon to explain what sunsetted meant. She said “Any defense attorney or expert who would try to hold it out in court as current accepted science, would have egg on their face. They’d get discredited.” 

Sharon Kramer writes to the The Daily Beast

The advice this doctor is giving is out of date and dangerous to promote as current accepted science.  It doesn’t appear that she even read much before she wrote — including the references she cited. It states at the bottom of the very last page, “AAAAI Position Statements and Work Group Reports are not to be considered to reflect current AAAAI standards or policy after five years from the date of publication. For reference only. February 2006.”

Kahn tells readers that “an internet search for ‘toxic mold’ will result in hundreds of scary warnings and ‘studies,’ but few are based in science—and many are motivated by profit.”  

Kahn not only dismisses hundreds of studies she also dismisses her patient who is concerned toxic mold might be causing his liver condition. This patient asks a valid question,  “Doc, do you think any of this has to do with the mold that was all over my old apartment building?” She says “This was not the first—and certainly won’t be the last—patient to ask about mold. Ultimately, I told this patient the same thing I told all the others: Mold exposure was not responsible for your health problems.” 

Sharon Kramer writes to The Daily Beast

“Also, I believe it’s generally accepted knowledge that aspergillus is a common fungus found in water damaged buildings and it does have the capability to cause liver damage.  This would be particularly true if one’s immune system and liver were already (immuno) compromised from alcohol consumption.”

Dr. Janette Hope who happens to be our mold doctor, wrote a journal article which stated, Aflatoxin is the leading cause of liver cancer in many developing countries. Hope is a top environmental doctor and was in the top 3% of her class at UCLA.   Dr Hope Journal Article 

I think it is important to note that Kahn is doing her endocrinology fellowship at Emory, a top research university. They have very close ties and work closely with the CDC.  Emory Collaboration with CDC  

Many mold victims wanted to respond to this article, but comments are disabled for this post. So we will have to resort to writing the editor. 

editorial@thedailybeast.com

Daily Beast Article-Farah Kahn